The life and landscapes of Humphry Repton

This Saturday marks 200 years since the death of Humphry Repton, the last great landscape designer of the Georgian era. Advising on some 400 schemes across a 27 year career, Repton filled the void left after the death of Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown in 1783, and linked the 18th century landscape tradition with the gardenesque movement of the early Victorian era. Early Life Much of Repton’s life and career played out in the East of England. He was born in BuryRead more

You Didn’t Know it was Neo-Georgian

You might think you know about Georgian architecture but what is Neo-Georgian? How does it differ from the original and what difference does that little word ‘neo’ make? Written by Elizabeth McKellar, Professor of Architectural and Design History at the Open University and co-author of Neo Georgian Architecture 1880- 1970. What is Neo-Georgian Architecture and when did it begin? Neo-Georgian is the term used to describe any buildings that date from after Georgian architecture faded, c. 1840, that re-use its classical approachRead more

Gruesome Georgians: Crime and Punishment

In Georgian Britain, crime was rife. Over 200 offences were punishable by death, including murder, rape, arson, forgery and sheep stealing. A gruesome, painful and humiliating demise was often favoured by the courts. Many buildings and structures related to Georgian crime and punishment survive, and many are listed as  fine examples of Georgian architecture, as well as for their place in the fascinating history of our justice system. The Women’s Prison, York (now York Castle Museum). Grade I listed The grandRead more