London and Civil Liberties

Professor Anthony Grayling is a Philosopher and Master of New College of the Humanities Anthony is one of the sitters for Historic England’s I am London exhibition. His is the third in a series of guest blogs published throughout the exhibition. 11 July to 4 September 2016 FREE, 10am – 8pm, Monday to Sunday Central Saint Martins, UAL Window Galleries, Kings Cross “For nearly a thousand years London has been the centre of efforts by its citizens and fellow-citizens elsewhere in the kingdom to getRead more

The Big Issue: My London

George Anderson is a Big Issue vendor, and usually sells outside the BBC headquarters at Broadcasting House, London. George is one of the sitters for Historic England’s I am London exhibition. His is the second in a series of guest blogs published throughout the exhibition. 11 July to 4 September 2016 FREE, 10am – 8pm, Monday to Sunday Central Saint Martins, UAL Window Galleries, Kings Cross Header image: The Langham Hotel, London via Wikimedia Commons “As with the many people who travel from all over the worldRead more

Discovered by Disaster: 6 Astounding Archaeological Finds from Environmental Change

Those of us working with the past can occasionally be viewed as stuck in it, not wanting things to change, but actually for archaeologists change is our bread and butter. We are obsessed with how, and why, people and their places have changed through time. Sometimes dramatic changes in the environment can lead to particularly exciting discoveries. Here are 6 of the best archaeological discoveries as a result of environmental change: Written by Hannah Fluck, Historic Environment Intelligence Officer, Historic England.Read more

A Brief History of the Bronze Age

The recent discoveries  of extraordinarily well-preserved 3,000-year-old homes at Must Farm in Cambridgeshire have highlighted the sophistication of domestic life towards the end of the Bronze Age, around 900 BC. But the Bronze Age was a long period, beginning some 1300 years earlier when life was very different to that of the inhabitants of Must Farm. Here we look at how technology and ways of life in England developed during the preceding millennium. Written by Dr. Jonathan Last, Landscape StrategyRead more

I am London: A Guest Blog from Bisi Alimi

Bisi Alimi is a human rights activist. In 2004 he became the first Nigerian to openly declare his sexuality on national television. After increased threats to his life he moved to London, where he was granted asylum in 2008. Bisi is one of the sitters for Historic England’s I am London exhibition. His is the first in a series of guest blogs published throughout the exhibition. 11 July to 4 September 2016 FREE, 10am – 8pm, Monday to Sunday Central Saint Martins, UALRead more

6 Sites of Memory for Overseas War Heroes

The First and Second World Wars were truly global in scale and involvement. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers died supporting the British army, including troops from the colonies, and European countries that had been invaded by enemy forces. Here are 6 sites in England which pay homage to the enormous contribution made by foreign soldiers during the First and Second World Wars. Header image: No. 305 Polish Bomber Squadron taken in 1942 at RAF Cammeringham in Lincolnshire. 1. The Polish War Memorial, Hillingdon, Grade IIRead more

7 Things You May Not Know About the Battle of the Somme

This year marks the centenary of the Battle of the Somme, which took place between 1st July and 18th November 1916. The battle was a joint offensive by the British and French forces – fought along both sides of the River Somme in France – aimed at decisively defeating the Germany Army. Britain fielded a one million strong ‘New Army’ made up of inexperienced but enthusiastic volunteers from all walks of life, raised in a fervour of patriotism by FieldRead more

Not so run of the mill:  8 inspired converted mills in West Yorkshire

The textile mills of West Yorkshire were the original Northern Powerhouses at the centre of the Industrial Revolution.  These impressive structures still shape the rural and urban landscapes of the region but they are taking on new roles as desirable homes, offices, funky bars and chic restaurants and even an NHS Centre for Outpatients (at Acre Mills, Huddersfield). Many of these amazing places have been successfully and creatively adapted but more remain underused and awaiting a new purpose.  To markRead more

7 LGBT+ Landmarks to Look Out For On London Pride Weekend

Each year, Pride in London fills the capital with rainbow illuminated celebrations; a platform to raise awareness of LGBT+ issues and campaign for equality for all parts of the community. The two week celebrations will culminate in the Pride in London Parade this weekend, when a procession of members and supporters of the LGBT+ community will take over the West End. Our heritage project, Pride of Place combines images, archive materials and research to map the places and stories thatRead more

The Hidden History of Apethorpe

The great country house of Apethorpe in Northamptonshire was sadly dilapidated in 2004, when English Heritage (now Historic England) began a programme of urgent repairs. As work progressed, many exciting discoveries were made underneath floorboards, behind modern wall surfaces, inside ancient roofs, or hiding in plain sight. Every single finding, no matter how small, deepened our understanding of the property and its illustrious owners.Read more