Modernism at the Seaside

The 1930s saw a great diversity of architectural styles: from Neo-Georgian for town halls and mock Tudor for suburban semis, to ‘anything goes’ for the latest cinemas. But the seaside was the setting for some of Britain’s first and finest ventures into Modernism, a new movement that espoused the benefits of sunshine, simplicity and space. Here are 6 of the finest examples of Modernism at the English seaside:  1. The Midland hotel, Morecambe Designed by Oliver Hill, one of the England’sRead more

On the Beach

The first August Bank Holiday in 1872 prompted an exodus of people from England’s cities to the seaside, including to Hastings where the new pier opened on that day. And each year since, except during the wars, millions have followed them. Historic England’s beach bum, sorry seaside expert, Allan Brodie looks through our archive to illustrate how beach holidays have changed over the centuries. The recorded story of days on the beach begins in the early 18th century. In theRead more

London’s Glitter and Dust

Zainab Rahim is a writer and the joint editor-in-chief of a commentary website called The Platform, seeking to advance marginalised narratives. The Platform welcomes new writers, researchers and campaigners. You can see the latest updates by following them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. You can find Zainab on Twitter and Instagram @ZaiNoted. Zainab is one of the sitters for Historic England’s I am London exhibition. Hers is the fourth in a series of guest blogs published throughout the exhibition. 11 July to 4 September 2016 FREE,Read more

Devon’s Shipwrecks

Shipwrecks don’t just happen in the deep sea: many ships are driven ashore or lie slowly decaying along riverbanks, estuaries, and creeks. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has given protection to three such ‘shoreline’ wrecks on Historic England’s recommendation. For all three, one of the major factors in assessing their national significance for protection was their rarity. Generally speaking, the further back we go in time, the rarer the evidence is for shipwrecks around England’s coasts. So justRead more

7 International Architects Who Helped Shape England

Architects from around the world have lived and worked in England in relatively small numbers for several centuries. In particular, the 20th century saw a large influx: many of them refugees fleeing the political situation in Europe. Their contribution to the built environment is undeniable, and they are responsible for some of the most important buildings of the 20th and 21st Centuries. 1. Amyas Connell Born at the turn of the Twentieth Century, Amyas Connell came to Europe from hisRead more

If Street Furniture Could Talk

Street furniture probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when you think of protected heritage. But our high streets and country lanes would be a poorer place without the milestones, lamp posts, horse troughs and bollards that collectively remind us of how very different from today our streets once were. As our busy roads are adapted to accommodate modern transport schemes, these small elements can easily be swept away. Significant pieces are protected by listing so they remainRead more

We Are London

Our exhibition I am London celebrates the capital’s unique and complex identity. 59 fascinating Londoners have been photographed in historic places that mean something to them and, in turn, show the city’s heritage is the building blocks for its future. Among well-known faces are unsung heroes, each photographed alongside a building which means something to them. We asked people to put themselves forward to be our 60th portrait sitter, by answering the same questions our other Londoners answered: what historicRead more

9 Reasons to Look Up in Yorkshire

You may think you know a place well, but if you take the opportunity to look up, you may be surprised at what you discover. To celebrate Yorkshire Day (1st August), Emma Sharpe, Assistant Inspector of Historic Buildings and Areas, gives us her pick of 9 reasons to look up in Yorkshire. 1. Leeds’ Abandoned Skywalk Grade II listed Bank House in Leeds is an architecturally adventurous example of the Bank of England’s 1960s building program. It has an interestingRead more

How to do… Buildings Archaeology

Buildings: we live and work in them, use them and ignore them. But are they wallpaper to you or are you fascinated by them, their design and their history? We can all enjoy buildings more with an archaeological approach and here are some tips on how to interpret, analyse and record them. You’ll soon know your crucks from your plinths… Written by Lucy Jessop, Senior Investigator, Historic England. Header Image: Avon Mills, Malmesbury, Wiltshire. 1. Investigation We look closely at buildingsRead more

London and Civil Liberties

Professor Anthony Grayling is a Philosopher and Master of New College of the Humanities Anthony is one of the sitters for Historic England’s I am London exhibition. His is the third in a series of guest blogs published throughout the exhibition. 11 July to 4 September 2016 FREE, 10am – 8pm, Monday to Sunday Central Saint Martins, UAL Window Galleries, Kings Cross “For nearly a thousand years London has been the centre of efforts by its citizens and fellow-citizens elsewhere in the kingdom to getRead more