A brief introduction to prehistoric caves

Scientific interest in caves and rock shelters began in the early 19th century, when discoveries of bones of extinct animals were thought by some to come from an age before the Biblical flood.Read more

What archaeology can tell us about the history of migration in England

To mark International Migrant’s Day 2018, we take a look at 7 archaeological and historical objects that help to tell the history of migration in England.Read more

6 Reasons to love historic Norfolk

Norfolk is rich in English history and the vast, flat landscape has inspired artists, writers and poets for centuries.Read more

The silent service: Britain’s nuclear submarines

Many 20th century military sites survive around the country, and a number of these sites are protected due to their special architectural or historic interest.Read more

Women in Science: 10 minutes with an Archaeological Conservator

Ahead of Heritage Open Days, we speak to two Archaeological Conservators about their favourite finds and what got them interested in archaeological objects.Read more

Slipping Away: Coastal Erosion and Archaeology

England’s coastline has always been on the move. We take a look at 7 of the best archaeological discoveries revealed by or at risk from coastal erosion.Read more

Women in Science: 10 minutes with a Materials Scientist

As part of our Women in Science series, we spoke to Sarah Paynter, Materials Scientist at Historic England, about how her work informs our understanding of the past.Read more

Scheduling Makes its Stamp on Ancient Britain

Today, the Royal Mail have released a set of ‘Ancient Britain’ Stamps, continuing a long tradition of depicting historic subjects on stamps that dates back to the 1960s, when the Post Office began to issue sets of special stamps on a regular basis. Around twelve sets of ‘special stamps’ are issued every year. Eight historic sites and archaeological finds from around Britain are depicted on the new Ancient Britain stamps: five in England and one each in Scotland, Wales andRead more

Britain’s Earliest Mummy and the People of Wor Barrow

Long barrows are the burial places of Britain’s early farming communities and are the oldest monuments surviving in our landscape. These earthen mounds acted as funeral monuments during the Early Neolithic (3700-3500 BC) and reveal much about the communities buried within them. Peter Marshall, Historic England’s Scientific Dating Coordinator and Jonathan Last, our Landscape Strategy Manager, take us through new findings from an extraordinary long barrow excavated over a century ago. Wor Barrow Wor Barrow lies within Cranborne Chase inRead more