Top 5 Blog Posts of 2016

This year we’ve been demystifying Listing, talking about the importance of public art, and exploring LGBTQ history, among many other topics. In case you missed them, here’s a recap of the most-read blog posts of this year. Let us know in the comments what you’d like to see on Heritage Calling in 2017. 1. 7 Buildings to Mark the Brontë Bicentenary   From the buildings that inspired her first novel Jane Eyre, to the house where she contracted a fatal illness, hereRead more

Christmas Gifts for the Person who has Everything   

We’ve got Christmas covered this year with a selection of gift ideas to help you surprise someone special and support the work of heritage organisations. 1. Pick a place they love Create a unique, personal gift and support our work. Our dedicated online gift shop has a huge range of beautiful images – from striking landscapes and historical architecture, to animals in the wild, trains, planes and automobiles; sports stadiums and famous works of art. There’s something for every interest, with speedy deliveryRead more

Gruesome Georgians: Crime and Punishment

In Georgian Britain, crime was rife. Over 200 offences were punishable by death, including murder, rape, arson, forgery and sheep stealing. A gruesome, painful and humiliating demise was often favoured by the courts. Many buildings and structures related to Georgian crime and punishment survive, and many are listed as  fine examples of Georgian architecture, as well as for their place in the fascinating history of our justice system. The Women’s Prison, York (now York Castle Museum). Grade I listed The grandRead more

On the Beach

The first August Bank Holiday in 1872 prompted an exodus of people from England’s cities to the seaside, including to Hastings where the new pier opened on that day. And each year since, except during the wars, millions have followed them. Historic England’s beach bum, sorry seaside expert, Allan Brodie looks through our archive to illustrate how beach holidays have changed over the centuries. The recorded story of days on the beach begins in the early 18th century. In theRead more

London’s Glitter and Dust

Zainab Rahim is a writer and the joint editor-in-chief of a commentary website called The Platform, seeking to advance marginalised narratives. The Platform welcomes new writers, researchers and campaigners. You can see the latest updates by following them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. You can find Zainab on Twitter and Instagram @ZaiNoted. Zainab is one of the sitters for Historic England’s I am London exhibition. Hers is the fourth in a series of guest blogs published throughout the exhibition. 11 July to 4 September 2016 FREE,Read more

England’s Quirkiest Listed Places

The history of our land and its people is marked in the fabric of England’s buildings and places. The most significant of these are listed, so they can be understood and protected for the future. The List has almost 400,000 entries: barrows and bunkers, palaces and pigsties, plague crosses and piers, tower blocks and tombstones, cathedrals, windmills and roller coasters. It started life in 1882, when the first powers of protection were established. It is a unique record of theRead more

7 Sensational Sites for Eliza Doolittle Day

‘One evening the King will say ‘Oh, Liza, old thing, I want all of England your praises to sing. Next week on the twentieth of May, I proclaim Liza Doolittle Day’. My Fair Lady Written by Joe Flatman, Head of Central Casework and Programmes at Historic England For those who love the musical play and film My Fair Lady, the 20th May is celebrated annually as Eliza Doolittle Day: a light-hearted commemoration of all things musical-related. This 20th of MayRead more