10 Hidden Creatures You Might Have Missed in London

London’s extraordinary sculpted creatures – great and small, historic and modern – are hiding in plain sight; easy to miss when the city is full of the bustle of human activity.

Here we take a look at ten hidden creatures to spot on your next walk through London.

1. Leopard, Gresham Street, City of London

Leopard detail, Goldsmiths’ Garden, site of the former medieval church and churchyard of St John Zachary (partially destroyed in the Great Fire of London), Gresham Street © Nicky Hughes

The image of the leopard’s head is the historic London hallmark of the Goldsmiths’ Company Assay Office.

The Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths – one of the City of London’s twelve ancient livery companies (trade and guild associations) – has owned the land here since the 14th century. Their livery hall is on the other side of the road. The site was first transformed into a garden by Fire Wardens after the Blitz during the Second World War.

Entrance arch to Goldsmiths’ Garden © Jerry Young

In 1994/1995, the Company created a new layout for the secret sunken garden which now includes a fountain, sculpture, public seating and an arch set with a leopard’s head made by apprentices managed by the Blacksmiths’ Company.

2. Mice, 23 Eastcheap, City of London

Sculpture of two mice tugging at a piece of food, 23 Eastcheap © Jerry Young

Very little is known about the origin of these tiny mice, but they may have been carved when the building – offices and warehousing – was constructed 1861-1862 by architects Young & Sons for the spice merchants, Messrs. Hunt & Crombie.

The mice carving is high up on the building and has been painted in the modern era, probably to make them more visible. The shell plaque beneath the mice records the architects’ name © Nicky Hughes

Why the mice are there is the subject of various enjoyable urban myths.  Most popular is that two of the builders got into a fight over a cheese sandwich, with each accusing the other of theft, causing them to fall to their deaths from the building. Mice were the true culprits of course.

3. Insects and other creatures, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Bloomsbury

The first floor iron balconies of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Bloomsbury (Listed Grade II), are each decorated with two gilded insects or creatures. The image above shows 18 of them, formed into a grid for easy reference © Colin/Wikimedia Commons

All the creatures pictured are ‘vectors of disease’ – living organisms that can transmit dangerous infectious pathogens between humans, or from animals to humans – and include tsetse fly, flea, mosquito and rat.

They are powerful symbols of the work of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine – a world-renowned research and education centre dedicated to public and global health. The names of eminent medical scientists are carved high around the building.

The School was designed 1926-1928 in Art Deco style by architects Percy Morley Horder and Verner Rees and is their most celebrated building.

4. India House Menagerie, India House, Aldwych

India House houses the High Commission of India. The building was inaugurated on 8 July 1930 by King George V who was also the Emperor of India.

India House was designed by architect Herbert Baker who, together with equally celebrated architect Edwin Lutyens, designed the key administrative buildings of New Delhi, which became the capital of the British Raj in 1931.

India House has many decorative details of Indian origin, both in the interior and on the facade, including two tall columns with elephant bases and powerfully stylised lioness finials
India House has many decorative details of Indian origin, both in the interior and on the facade, including two tall columns with elephant bases and powerfully stylised lioness finials (pictured) guarding the main entrance © Jerry Young

5. Endangered animals, Northumberland Avenue, Trafalgar Square

Detail from large carved panels,’ Endangered Species’, set either side of a doorway to the modern Grand Buildings
Detail from large carved panels,’ Endangered Species’, set either side of a doorway to the modern Grand Buildings, Northumberland Avenue, Trafalgar Square © Nicky Hughes

The Portland stone panels, including the Marine Life ‘Endangered Species’ panel pictured below, were created by sculptor Barry Baldwin over three a year period around 1990.

Baldwin also carved a stone self-portrait on the central keystone above the panels showing him clutching his head, with his wristwatch displaying eleven o’clock – the ‘eleventh hour’ – symbolising how little time is left for mankind to save these species.

Marine detail from one of the large carved panels
Marine detail from one of the large carved panels,’ Endangered Species’. This panel includes an octopus, turtle, whale, dolphin and shark © Nicky Hughes

6. Creatures great and small, Natural History Museum, South Kensington

By the mid-19th century, the natural history collection of the British Museum had outgrown its premises, with many new specimens flooding in from expeditions, alongside a rapidly expanding knowledge of the natural world. 

Its Superintendent (later the Natural History Museum’s first director), Richard Owen, proposed the idea of a ‘cathedral to nature’ in a new location. The young little known architect, Alfred Waterhouse, was appointed in 1865 to realise Owens’s vision.

Five panels of animal decoration, including a kangaroo and a wolf, above the entrance to the museum
Five panels of animal decoration, including a kangaroo and a wolf, above the entrance to the museum. Note the monkey peeping out above the left hand window arch and the pig above the right © Jerry Young

Waterhouse designed a strikingly unusual building in Gothic revival and colourful Romanesque style.

Scimitar-toothed lion (L) and Palaeotherium (R) gargoyles
Scimitar-toothed lion (L) and Palaeotherium (R) gargoyles © Jerry Young

The museum’s extraordinary terracotta decoration, interior and exterior, is based on a teeming variety of mammals, reptiles, insects, aquatic creatures and plants – living, extinct, fossilized. Waterhouse’s exact designs took inspiration from specimens and scientific illustrations supplied by Owen. The London architectural modelling company, Farmer & Brindley – working with French sculptor Dujardin – created the models which were then cast by Gibbs & Canning, Staffordshire, manufacturers of architectural terracotta.

The museum opened to visitors 18 April 1881.

7. Frogs, Clerkenwell

One of two gargoyle-type frogs hanging on the sides of a panel of decorative brickwork, former Criterion Hotel
One of two gargoyle-type frogs hanging on the sides of a panel of decorative brickwork, former Criterion Hotel, Clerkenwell, built by the owners of the local Cannon Brewery © Jerry Young

These unusual frogs – which may seem more at home on a Gothic cathedral – appear to have been carved of the same stone as the line of moulding to which they are attached. Their history is lost.

One of two gargoyle-type frogs hanging on the sides of a panel of decorative brickwork, former Criterion Hotel
The two gargoyle-type frogs © Jerry Young

The sawtooth panel of brickwork is equally unusual. Normally such brickwork is used in a single or double decorative row, following the line of a house’s eaves, typically in the 1870s/1880s. This building’s carved plaque dates it to 1876.

The two gargoyle-type frogs visible on the third floor
The two gargoyle-type frogs visible on the third floor © Jerry Young

8. Swans and camels, Albert Embankment

One of fifteen Victorian public benches
One of fifteen Victorian public benches, featuring cast iron swan armrests, that line the Albert Embankment between Westminster Bridge and Albert Bridge. Listed Grade II.© Jerry Young

The Albert Embankment (1869), along with the Victoria (1870) and Chelsea (1874) Embankments, were created by reclaiming marshy riverside land and muddy foreshore to accommodate low lying sewers – part of a vast new sewerage system for London designed by Sir Joseph Balazgette, chief engineer of the Metropolitan Board of Works (MBW).

Bench with cast-iron kneeling camel armrests
Bench with cast-iron kneeling camel armrests. These, plus benches with sphinx armrests – twenty-one in total – face the river on the Victoria Embankment. Listed Grade II © Jerry Young

The MBW’s Superintending Architect was George Vulliamy. As an integral part of the riverside scheme, Vulliamy designed street furniture -including the pictured benches, as well as the tall cast-iron lamps (originally gas), with their elaborate wide-mouthed curved sturgeons, that stand along the Victoria and Albert Embankments. He also designed the two great bronze sphinxes that guard Cleopatra’s Needle on the Victoria Embankment.

9. Boar, 33-35 Eastcheap, City of London

The Gothic-style façade of 33-35 Eastcheap
The Gothic-style façade of 33-35 Eastcheap, featuring the central sculpture of a boar’s head. Listed Grade II* © Jerry Young

Designed by English architect Robert Roumieu, this building was constructed in 1868 as a warehouse for vinegar merchants Hill & Evans, the largest vinegar brewers in Britain during the Victorian era, growing to be the largest in the world.

33-35 Eastcheap
33-35 Eastcheap is considered one of the most remarkable and exuberant examples of the Gothic style applied to a commercial building. The design caused a sensation in its day © Tony Hisgett

The boar’s head sculpture is a reference to the building standing on the site of the former Boar’s Head Tavern, supposedly the favourite inn used by Falstaff in Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part 1, later destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666.

10. Horse, Unilever House, 100 Victoria Embankment

A massive shire horse seen being restrained by one of two male figures -‘Controlled Energy’, Unilever House
A massive shire horse seen being restrained by one of two male figures -‘Controlled Energy’, Unilever House, 100 Victoria Embankment. Listed Grade II. An identical sculpture with two female figures stands at the other end of the building. The equestrian sculptures are by William Reid Dick, a prolific designer of war memorials © Jerry Young

Lord Leverhulme, commissioned Unilever House as the headquarters of his soap company, Lever Brothers. Designed in Neo-Classical Art Deco style, the building overlooks Blackfriars Bridge with a sweeping curved façade. It opened 18 July 1932.

Each sculpture required large blocks of Portland stone being raised up high to the plinths – one at each end of the building –  before being built into a rough approximation of the sculpture. Reid Dick’s assistants then removed superfluous stone before he chiselled and created the forms.

Written by Nicky Hughes.

Further Information

1 response to 10 Hidden Creatures You Might Have Missed in London

  1. Ray Bird says:

    Many thanks Nicky for these super pictures and annotations. Hope to see more in a future blog.
    Shame that we seem to have lost this spirit of inventiveness and fun – and craftsmanship.

Leave a Reply